Symposia/Lectures/SIGs

SATURDAY JUNE 8

Symposia:

• Residents’ Section Symposium and Dinner – Preparing for Fellowship Training

SUNDAY JUNE 9

CAP Award Lectures:

• Junior Scientist Award Lecture: Molecular Classification of Endometrial Sarcoma

• William Boyd Lecture: Genomic Disruption of Pathology Research and Care: Time Warp – It’s Our 1850’s Moment Again

Symposium:

• Patient Safety and Quality Assurance

SIG Sessions:

• Guillermo Quinonez Seminar on the Medical Humanities

• International Pathology Symposium (CAP-ACP/WASPaLM): Pathology in Asia

MONDAY JUNE 10

Symposia:

• Hematopathology Symposium: Measuring Hematopathology Workload: Is it Really Different from Anatomic Pathology?

• Canadian Society of Cytopathology and Kulcsar Lecture: Pulmonary Cytology: Blowing New Life into Diagnostic Challenges

• Advanced Diagnostics: Digital Pathology: The Beginning of a New Era in Pathology Practice

• Forensic Pathology/Neuropathology: Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP): a Pediatric Neuropathology Perspective

TUESDAY JUNE 11

Symposia:

• Anatomical Pathology: Genitourinary Pathobiology

• Pediatric and Perinatal Pathology

• microRNAs: Are We Ready for these Promising Disease Markers?

• Dr. Cam Coady Slide Seminar: Pancreas and Biliary Tract Pathology

• A Canadian Approach to Standardized Cervico-Vaginal Biopsy Reporting


Residents’ Section Symposium: Preparing for Fellowship Training

Saturday, June 8, 1800-1900

Co-Chairs:

Louis-Philippe Gagnon, Université Laval, Quebec City, Quebec

Chantale Morin, Université Laval, Quebec City, Quebec

Preparing for Fellowship Training

Golnar Rasty, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario

Objectives:

At the end of this session the participants will be able to:

    • Obtain an understanding of the content of pathology fellowship programs in Canada.
    • Understand the application process for pathology fellowship in USA.
    • Know the pathology fellowship programs available in Europe.

This symposium is followed by the Residents’ Dinner at a local restaurant.

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Patient Safety and Quality Assurance Symposium

Sunday, June 9, 1400-1600

Interpretive Diagnostic Accuracy and Error

Raouf E. Nakhleh, Mayo Clinic Florida, Jacksonville, Florida

Objectives:

At the end of this session the participants will be able to:

  • Summarize the extent and importance of interpretive errors.
  • List the factors that contribute to an accurate interpretive diagnosis.
  • Discuss how these factors can be optimized to minimize error.

This symposium will focus on the factors that affect interpretive diagnostic accuracy and error. These factors include; 1) knowledge, experience and training, 2) standardization of procedures and terminology, 3) clinical correlation, 4) ancillary studies and 5) redundancy. Specific examples will be discussed to illustrate how each of these factors contributes to diagnostic accuracy and how these factors may be used to optimize interpretive diagnoses. The symposium will be of value to: pathology residents, general and anatomic pathologists.

E. Douglas Bell, Canadian Medical Protective Association, Ottawa, Ontario

Objectives:

At the end of this session the participants will be able to:

  • List medical-legal issues in the practice of pathology.
  • Define “just culture” and importance of quality improvement.
  • List types of reviews to investigate an adverse event.

A ten year review of medical legal cases involving pathologists will be presented with a focus placed on the pre-analytic, analytic and post analytic phases of activity. The concept of a “just culture” will be discussed. The role of an accountability review and a quality improvement review following an adverse event will be explored. The symposium will be of value to pathology residents, general and anatomic pathologists and physician leaders interested in patient safety and quality assurance.

This symposium is followed by the Patient Safety and Quality Assurance Section Annual General Meeting.

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CAP-ACP Junior Scientist Award Lecture: Molecular Classification of Endometrial Sarcoma

Sunday, June 9, 1700-1745

Molecular Classification of Endometrial Sarcoma

Cheng-Han Lee, Junior Scientist Award Recipient & Lecturer, University of Alberta and Royal Alexandra Hospital, Edmonton, Alberta

Objectives:

At the end of this session the participants will be able to:

    • Explain the genetic heterogeneity of endometrial sarcoma (endometrial stromal sarcoma and undifferentiated endometrial sarcoma) and the clinical importance of integrating tumor genetics in its classification.
    • List the histologic and immunophenotypic features of the different genetic types of endometrial sarcoma.
    • Discuss the use of conventional molecular diagnostics and emerging sequencing technology as ancillary tools in the diagnosis of endometrial sarcoma.

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CAP-ACP William Boyd Lecture: Genomic Disruption of Pathology Research and Care: Time Warp – It’s Our 1850’s Moment Again

Sunday, June 9, 1745-1830

Genomic Disruption of Pathology Research and Care: Time Warp – It’s Our 1850’s Moment Again

David Huntsman, BC Cancer Research Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia

Objectives:

At the end of this sessions participants will understand, and accept or reject the following concepts:

  • Personalized medicine, Inter-tumoral heterogeneity and the need for precision diagnostics.
  • Beyond seeing – why we need to move pathology from phenomena to noumena by decoding cancers to understand, diagnose and treat.
  • Why we are again indebted to Darwin – intra-tumoral heterogeneity and the need to assess cancers across space and time.
  • Diagnostic integration and how we could evolve to help our patients more.
  • Why this is the 1850s for pathology all over again – the grand opportunity is the perceived threat.

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Guillermo Quinonez Seminar on the Medical Humanities SIG

Sunday, June 9, 2000-2200

Chair: Laurette Geldenhuys, QE II Health Sciences Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia

Tribute to Dr. Murray J. Robertson

Victor Tron, Kingston General Hospital and Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario

Dr. Robertson had a distinguished 30 year career at Queen’s University and Kingston General Hospital as an academic neuropathologist. A 1955 graduate of Queen’s, in 1962 following completion of his neuropathology training at Duke, Dr. Robertson returned to Kingston to assume his first academic and hospital appointments as Assistant Professor of Pathology (Neuropathology) at Queen’s University and as Neuropathologist at Kingston General and Hotel Dieu Hospitals. He became an Associate Professor in 1967, full Professor in 1969 and, from 1979 to 1986, he was Head of the Department of Pathology at Queen’s. During his Headship, he held the concurrent appointment of Pathologist-in-Chief at Kingston General Hospital, and during his career he established the Neuropathology Division of the Department of Pathology as a successful and internationally recognized academic unit.

Dr. Robertson had a highly successful career as an academic Neuropathologist. He published extensively, generating approximately 100 publications over the course of his career, and was recognized internationally for the quality of his research. In 1976, he received the Weil Award in Experimental Neuropathology from the American Association of Neuropathologists. He was also a member of the Editorial Board of Laboratory Investigation, the pre-eminent experimental pathology journal, from 1970-1994 and he was its Associate Editor from 1972-1975.

Dr. Robertson held numerous leadership positions in national and North American organizations. He was President of the Canadian Association of Neuropathologists (1971-73), President of the Intersociety Council of Laboratory Medicine of Canada (1973-74), President of the Canadian Association of Pathologists (1974-75), Vice-President of the United States/Canadian Division of the International Academy of Pathology (1982-1984) and President of the latter organization from 1984-85. During his career he established the Neuropathology Division of the Department of Pathology as a successful and internationally recognized academic unit.

The Development and Evaluation of a Visual Literacy Course for Pathology Residency Training; a Pilot Study

David Grynspan, Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, Ontario

Objectives:

    • To define “visual literacy”(VL) and its potential role in pathology educational curricula.
    • To share the CHEO/ U of Ottawa experience with a pilot initiatives.
    • To explore challenges but also future opportunities in teaching VL curricula and evaluating its impact.

Laboratory Medicine and Its Contribution to Clinical Care; A Historical Perspective

Laurette Geldenhuys, QE II Health Sciences Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia

Objectives:

At the end of the presentation participants will have an enhanced understanding of:

  • The historical development of laboratory medicine, including

    – Surgical Pathology

    – Cytopathology

    – Autopsy Pathology.

  • The important role of laboratory medicine in the advancement of clinical care over the last century.

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International Pathology Symposium: Pathology in Asia

Sunday, June 9, 2000-2200

Co-Chairs:

Hallgrimur Benediktsson, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta

Indrojit Roy, St. Mary’s Hospital and McGill University, Montreal, Quebec

Enhancing Pathology Practice in Countries-in-Need: The Role of WASPaLM

Lai Meng Looi, Immediate Past Chair of Pathology/Labs Univ of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Objectives:

At the end of this session the participants will be able to:

  • Summarize the health challenges faced by countries-in-need.
  • List the roles that the World Association of Societies of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine (WASPaLM) can play in enhancing pathology practice in countries-in-need.
  • Why we are again indebted to Darwin – intra-tumoral heterogeneity and the need to assess cancers across space and time.
  • Compare the roles of a global organization such as WASPaLM and national societies in effecting change..

Update on Projects

By the end of the presentations, attendees will be aware of the current opportunities to volunteer in providing pathology services and teaching opportunities in Turkey, Laos, and Africa.

Update on Laos Project

Hallgrimur Benediktsson, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta

Update on Africa Project

Indrojit Roy, St. Mary’s Hospital and McGill University, Montreal, Quebec

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Hematopathology Symposium: Measuring Hematopathology Workload: Is it Really Different from Anatomic Pathology?

Monday, June 10, 0800-1030

Chair:

Marciano Reis, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario

Measuring Hematopathology Workload: Is it Really Different from Anatomic Pathology?

Dr. Carol Cheung,Department of Pathology, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario

Objectives:

At the end of this session the participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the differences between categorical vs. complexity based pathologist workload models
  • Discuss the application of complexity based pathologist workload models to bone marrow pathology
  • Discuss the application of complexity based pathologist workload models to lymph node pathology

The Executive and Annual General Meeting of the CAP-ACP Section of Hematological Pathology will follow this symposium.

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Canadian Society of Cytopathology Symposium and Kulcsar Lecture

Monday, June 10, 0800-1030

Chair:

Karim Khetani, DynaLife Diagnostic Laboratories, Edmonton, Alberta

Pulmonary Cytology: Blowing New Life into Diagnostic Challenges

Manon Auger, Professor, Department of Pathology, McGill University, Director, Cytopathology Laboratory, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Quebec

Objectives:

  • To review adequacy criteria and explain how to approach and diagnose lung fine needle aspirates in certain special circumstances (eg. when the entire specimen is necrotic).
  • To present common differential diagnoses and to highlight the features enabling to reach the correct diagnosis.
  • To familiarize registrants with the major causes of false-positive and of false-negative diagnoses and outline features helping to recognize them.
  • To emphasize the cytologic and ancillary features that are helpful to subtype non-small cell carcinomas in respiratory cytologic specimens.
  • To show the diagnostic criteria of neuroendocrine tumors in respiratory cytologic specimens.
  • To present some lesions difficult to recognize in respiratory cytologic specimens.

Pulmonary Cytology: Blowing New Life into Diagnostic Challenges continues

The Annual General Meeting of the Canadian Society of Cytopathology will follow this symposium

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Advanced Diagnostics Symposium: Digital Pathology: The Beginning of a New Era in Pathology Practice

Monday, June 10, 1400-1700

Co-Chairs:

David M. Berman, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario

Emina Torlakovic, University Health Network and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario

Objectives:

At the end of this session the participants will be able to:

  • Understand the benefits and challenges of implementing a multi-institutional telepathology and sub-specialty network.
  • Understand the benefits and challenges of introducing new tools of advanced image analysis for pathology diagnosis.
  • Understand the importance of developing strategies for change management, validation, evaluation, quality assurance and practice planning.

Implementing a Telepathology Network: a Step Toward a Provincial/National Pathology Department?

Bernard Têtu, CHU de Québec, Hôpital du St-Sacrement, Québec, Québec

Objectives:

  • Understanding the benefits and challenges of implementing a multi-institutional patient-centered telepathology network for frozen sections, quality assurance and consultations (the experience of the Eastern Québec Telepathology Network).
  • Understanding the importance of developing a strategy of change management to insure the success of a telepathology network.
  • Understanding the importance of coordination and evaluation to insure sustainability.

This symposium is aimed at providing the participants with baseline and practical information on the use of telepathology as an enabling technology for Canadian pathologists. Emphasis will be placed on benefits and challenges of implementing a multi-institutional telepathology network and different network configuration models (centralized, decentralized, sub-specialty model) will be presented. Issues related to change management, coordination, quality assurance, validation and evaluation will be raised. The experience and lessons learned by major users in Canada will be presented. New developments in advanced image analysis in digital pathology will also be covered. The symposium will be of value to pathology residents, PAs, general and anatomic pathologists.

Recommendations for Validating Whole Slide Imaging Systems for Diagnostic Purposes in Pathology: Guideline from the College of American Pathologists Pathology and Laboratory Quality Centre

Andrew J. Evans, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario

Objectives:

At the end of this session the participants will:

  • Appreciate the need for validating WSJ digital pathology systems prior to using them for diagnostic purposes.
  • Understand the 12 WSJ validation guideline statements from the College of American Pathologists Pathology and Laboratory Quality Centre and how they were developed.
  • Recognize that the guideline will be reviewed regularly to incorporate new evidence and changes in WSI technology.

There is increasing interest in using whole slide imaging (WSI) for diagnostic purposes (primary and/or consultation). An important consideration is whether WSI can replace conventional light microscopy as the method by which pathologists review histologic sections, cytology and/or hematology slides to render diagnoses. Validation of WSI is crucial to ensure that diagnostic performance based on digitized slides is at least equivalent to that of glass slides and light microscopy. Currently, there are no standard guidelines regarding validation of WSI for diagnostic use. In 2010, the College of American Pathologists (CAP) Pathology and Laboratory Quality Center convened a non-vendor panel from North America with expertise in digital pathology to develop validation guidelines. A comprehensive literature review was performed to identify international publications that met search term requirements. Studies outside the scope of this effort and those related solely to technical elements, education and image analysis were excluded. Recommendations were derived from the strength of evidence determined from these published studies, public comment feedback and expert panel consensus. Twelve guideline statements were established to help pathology laboratories validate their own WSI systems intended for clinical use. Clinical validation should demonstrate that the WSI system under review produces acceptable digital slides for diagnostic interpretation. The intention of validating WSI systems is to improve the clinical use of this technology and reduce the risk of potential misdiagnosis for patient care. The presentation will review each of the twelve guideline statements and provide insight into how they were developed. It will be of value to pathology residents, general and anatomic pathologists who are considering the use of WSI technology for diagnostic purposes. Click here to view the College of American Pathologists (CAP) new evidence-based guideline: Validating Whole Slide Imaging for Diagnostic Purposes in Pathology.

Advanced Image Analysis in Digital Pathology: What We Have Now and What is Coming

Michael Feldman,University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Objectives:

At the end of this session the participants will:

  • Understand the breadth of image analysis application available today.
  • Understand how image analysis is being used for prognostic prediction. li>
  • Understand how image analysis applications are being used for integrated diagnostics.

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Forensic Pathology/Neuropathology Symposium: Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP): a Pediatric Neuropathology Perspective

Monday, June 10, 1400-1700

Co-Chairs:

Jacqueline Parai, The Ottawa Hospital and the Ontario Forensic Pathology Service, Ottawa, Ontario

John Woulfe, The Ottawa Hospital and University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario

Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy: Clinical Considerations

Elizabeth J Donner, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario

Objectives:

  • To become familiar with the definition of SUDEP.
  • Understanding the benefits and challenges of using digital pathology as an enabling technology.
  • To review the clinical risk factors that have been identified for SUDEP.
  • To review the hypothesized mechanisms for SUDEP.

Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP): Autopsy Perspective

Christopher Milroy, The Ottawa Hospital and the Ontario Forensic Pathology Service, Ottawa, Ontario

Objectives:

  • To learn to recognize case SUDEP in the context of undifferentiated sudden death.
  • To review the role of the autopsy in SUDEP.
  • To understand the ancillary tests emerging for SUDEP autopsies.

Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP): a Neuropathology Perspective

Jean Michaud, Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, Ontario

Objectives:

  • To identify the morphological criteria needed for fulfilling the definition(s) of SUDEP.
  • Understanding the benefits and challenges of using digital pathology as an enabling technology.
  • To review key practical elements in the examination of brains with possible SUDEP.
  • To review the most recent classification of focal cortical dysplasia and explore the major developmental/genetically determined entities related to SUDEP/epilepsy.

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Anatomical Pathology Symposium: Surgical Pathology of Urinary Tract Tumors

Tuesday, June 11, 0800-1130

Chair: Golnar Rasty, University of Toronto and University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario

Moderator: Joan Sweet, The Toronto General Hospital and University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario

Overview:

The symposium is intended to provide a practical approach to common diagnostic challenges in the interpretation of bladder biopsies. The issues discussed encompass challenges in assessing the grade and stage of urothelial tumors. The symposium will be of value to pathology residents, as well as general and anatomic pathologists

The New International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Vancouver Classification of Renal Neoplasia

John Srigley,Trillium Health Partners, Mississauga, Ontario

Objectives:

At the end of this session the participants will be able to:

  • Understand the background and methodology used for the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Renal Neoplasia.
  • Discuss 5 new carcinoma entities accepted into the ISUP Vancouver classification system.
  • Explain three emerging carcinomas considered emerging and provisional entities.
  • List some of the other consensus conference recommendations pertaining to the existing categories in the WHO 2004 classification.

Renal Tumor Specimen Handling and Staging – What Pathologist Needs to Know in 2013

Kiril Trpkov,University of Calgary, Calgary Laboratory Services, and Rockyview General Hospital, Calgary, Alberta

Objectives:

At the end of this session the participants will be able to:

  • Participants will learn the current approach in renal specimen handling and staging based on the ISUP consensus.
  • Participants will be able to recognize and understand the importance of appropriate renal tumor sampling for tumor staging and will learn the ISUP consensus developed criteria for histologic diagnosis and assessment of specific staging issues.
  • Participants will learn specific strategies for adequate sampling, in particular sampling of renal tumor, evaluation of invasion into perirenal fat, renal sinus, renal vein, and adrenal gland, multiple renal tumor evaluation, appropriate tumor measurement and other relevant sampling and staging issues.

Moderators Part 2:

Mathieu Latour, CHUM – Hôpital Saint-Luc, Montreal, Québec

Bernard Têtu, CHU de Québec, Hôpital du St-Sacrement, Québec, Québec

Molecular Testing in Kidney Cancer: From Dream to Reality

George M. Yousef, St. Michael’s Hospital and the University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario

Objectives:

At the end of this session the participants will be able to:

  • Explain the role of molecular testing in improving patient management in kidney cancer.
  • Summarize the molecular approaches that are used to achieve personalized medicine in kidney cancer.
  • Discuss the challenges that face the new era of molecular pathology.

Challenges in the Interpretation of Urinary Bladder Biopsies

Fadi Brimo, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Québec

Objectives:

At the end of this session the participants will:

  • Become familiar with the current grading system of urothelial papillary neoplasms and the approach to borderline cases.
  • Become familiar with the following issues in staging urothelial neoplasms:
    • Differentiating inverted growth pattern from true invasion
    • Differentiating invasion of muscularis mucosae from invasion of muscularis propria.
  • Become familiar with the different methods in sub-staging urothelial carcinoma invading the lamina propria (pT1).
  • Become familiar with the overlapping features between reactive urothelial atypia and carcinoma in-situ and how to differentiate between the two entities.

The symposium is intended to provide a practical approach to common diagnostic challenges in the interpretation of bladder biopsies. The issues discussed encompass challenges in assessing the grade and stage of urothelial tumors. The symposium will be of value to pathology residents, as well as general and anatomic pathologists.

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Pediatric and Perinatal Pathology Symposium

Tuesday, June 11, 0800-1130

Chair: Fergall Magee, Royal University Hospital, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

Prenatal Investigations For The Perinatal Pathologist

Fergall Magee,Royal University Hospital, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

Objectives:

At the end of the presentation the participants will have an enhanced understanding of prenatal screening for fetal risk assessment on the basis of:

  • Maternal age.
  • US findings.
  • Maternal serum factors.
  • The potential of newer technologies including non invasive pre-natal diagnosis (NIPD).
  • The future potential of screening for maternal hypertension and more widespread genetic screening
  • Issues around future decision making.

Diagnostic Utility Of Perinatal Autopsy Examination

Fergall Magee,Royal University Hospital, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

Objectives:

At the end of the presentation the participants will have an enhanced understanding of approaches to perinatal autopsy examination, including:

  • The changing epidemiology of perinatal death.
  • The nature and extent of the examination.
  • High yield investigations.
  • The diagnostic utility of post mortem CT/MRI and Tandem Mass Spectrometry (TMS).
  • Issues around the consent process.

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microRNAs: Are We Ready for these Promising Disease Markers?

Tuesday, June 11, 0800-1130

Chair: Raymond Lepage, Biron – Laboratoire médical Inc., Montreal, Quebec

microRNAs as Biomarkers for the Diagnosis of Human Disease: Promises and Challenges

Vincent De Guire, Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont and Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec

Objectives:

At the end of the this session, the participants will be able to:

  • Summarize the basics of miRNAs.
  • List different clinical applications of miRNA profiling
  • Discuss the particularities and challenges of miRNA detection.

microRNAs in Pancreatic Cancer and Why microRNAs are Ready for the Clinical Lab

Gregory J. Tsongalis, Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center and The Audrey and Theodor Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Lebanon, New Hampshire

Objectives:

At the end of the this session, the participants will be able to:

  • Describe how miRNAs regulate gene expression.
  • Identify potential uses of miRNAs as diagnostic markers
  • Describe how miRNAs could be used in prognostication of human cancers.

Role of Circulating microRNAs in Cancer Biology and Clinical Applications for miRNAs Based Diagnostic

Muller Fabbri, University of Southern California and Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California

Objectives:

At the end of the this session, the participants will be able to:

  • Explain the role of circulating mlcroRNAs as cancer biomarkers.
  • Understand the role of exosomic microRNAs as cancer biomarkers.
  • Learn the biologic implications of exosomic microRNAs in the biology of the tumor microenvironment.

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Dr. Cam Coady Slide Seminar: Pancreas and Biliary Tract Pathology

Tuesday, June 11, 1400-1700

Chair: Geneviève Soucy, Centre Hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec

Pancreas and Biliary Tract Pathology

Volkan Adsay, Emory University, Atlanta, USA

Download the advance materials

Objectives:

At the end of this sessions participants will be able to:

  • Summarize the most common solid and cystic pancreatic neoplasms and list the differential diagnosis.
  • Formulate a complete report on neuroendocrine tumors based on WHO-2010.
  • Discuss challenging aspects of ampullary and gallbladder tumors, flat (low and high grade) dysplasia as well as tumoral intraepithelial neoplasia (adenomatous) lesions and invasive carcinoma of the gallbladder and biliary tract and distinguish these from non-neoplastic mimics.

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A Canadian Approach to Standardized Cervico-Vaginal Biopsy Reporting

Tuesday, June 11, 1700-1815

Co-Chairs:

Maire A. Duggan, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta

Meg McLachlin, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario

The Lower Anogenital Squamous Terminology (LAST) Standardization Project for HPV-Associated Lesions

Maire A. Duggan, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta

Objectives:

At the end of this sessions participants will be able to:

  • Harmonize terminology used for reporting histopathology diagnoses of HPV-related muco-cutaneous squamous lesions of the lower ano-genital tract with current evidence based knowledge regarding HPV lesions and their clinical management.
  • Understand the recommended terminology which will be used for reporting histopathology diagnoses of HPV-related muco-cutaneous squamous lesions of the lower ano-genital tract.
  • Understand the use of new technologies to validate recommended terminology standards and be able to provide guidelines for their use.

Reporting Histopathology Specimens from the Cervix and Vagina – Developing Canadian Consensus

Meg McLachlin, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario

Objectives:

At the end of this sessions participants will be able to:

  • Identify the gaps identified in the Cervical Cancer Screening in Canada Monitoring Program Performance 2006-2008.
  • Be aware of the process used for developing consensus on reporting histopathology specimens from the cervix and vagina.
  • Understand the consensus statements including general statements and the reporting system.

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