Speaker Profiles

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Maadh Aldouri, Director of International Affairs, The Royal College of Pathologists

Dr Aldouri is the Program Clinical Director for cancer services, pathology and haematology at Medway Maritime Hospital and Director of clinical pathology at Darent Valley Hospitals in Kent. He also works as a Consultant Haematologist at KING’S College Hospital, London. He is a graduate of the College of Medicine of Bagdad University, Iraq and has worked in the Middle East for over ten years. In 1993 he co-founded the Riyadh Haematology Group in Saudi Arabia and in the UK, established a network of Iraqi pathologists. Dr Aldouri also currently chairs the Pathology Committee of the Inter-Collegiate Iraq Liaison Group. He is Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians, was awarded Membership of The Royal College of Pathologists in 1988, and was subsequently appointed as their International Advisor for the Middle East & North African (MENA) region in 2012. He was also a member of the College’s South Thames Regional Council between 2001 and 2003, and Chair of the Haematology Group of Kent and Medway Cancer Network from 2001-2014.

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Alma Cameron, QEII Hospital, Central Zone, Nova Scotia Health Authority

Alma Cameron is a Pathologist’s Assistant at the QEII Hospital, in the Central Zone of the Nova Scotia Health Authority. Alma has worked as a Pathologist’s assistant for 18 years. Alma worked as a Medical Laboratory Technologist in Anatomical Pathology before being a Pathologist Assistant. Alma has worked and continues to work in research at Dalhousie University in Developmental Embryology since 1990.

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Julian Christians, Simon Fraser University

Julian came to SFU in 2006 following postdoctoral work at the University of Edinburgh. Throughout his career, he has studied the genetic and physiological mechanisms that contribute to diversity within species, working with mice, humans, fish, fungi and birds. Some of his earlier work identified a gene that contributed to natural variation in skeletal growth in mice. However, this gene is also highly expressed in the placenta, and has subsequently been associated with various pregnancy complications, leading him to the field of placental biology. His research interests include placental development and function, and in particular how the placenta may influence the long term health of the offspring.

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Karen L. Dallas, Providence Health Care

I was born in Minnesota and completed my pre-medical training years outside of Canada. I was one of the few American students admitted to study Medicine at McGill each year. Afterwards, I completed my residency in Hematopathology in Toronto and received fellowship training in Transfusion Medicine & Coagulation at the infamous BloodCenter of Wisconsin.

I have practiced Transfusion and Hematopathology in both Saskatoon, SK and Edmonton, AB before migrating further westward to Vancouver. In Saskatoon, I was the Medical Director for Transfusion Medicine and also worked for the provincial government in the direction of Transfusion Medicine for the province. I was also a member of the National Advisory Committee on Blood and Blood Products (NAC).

I have been in Vancouver about a year. I took over for Dr. Debbie Griswold as the Division Head for Hematopathology when she retired. I am a member of the St. Paul’s Hospital Trauma Committee and I am actively involved with our Physician Engagement Committee here at SPH. Outside of SPH, I am on the provincial Transfusion Medicine Advisory Group which is the medical advisory group to the Ministry of Health and a group that is looked at with very high regard all across the country. Soon, I will also be stepping up into the role of Program Director for UBC’s Transfusion Medicine Fellowship Training Program.

Aside from Transfusion and Hematopathology, I am passionate about Global Medicine and have worked abroad numerous times (I’m going to Kenya again in August!). In my spare time, I am actively involved in the fitness industry (My most recent bodybuilding competition will have been July 9th!).

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Vincent De GuireVincent De Guire, Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont

Dr. Vincent De Guire is a Clinical Biochemist at Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital in Montreal. Beside his responsibilities in the clinical biochemistry lab, he is also a research associate and a clinical lecturer at the University of Montreal. Dr. De Guire is interested in the diagnostic and therapeutic potential of miRNAs, more specifically in ophthalmology, renal graft rejection and hematology. Active in the field, he was part of many miRNA sessions notably for the WASPaLM, The American Association for Clinical Chemistry and the Canadian Society of Clinical Chemistry.

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Elena Diana DiaconescuElena Diana Diaconescu, University of Toronto

Dr. Elena Diana Diaconescu is a fourth year Anatomical Pathology resident at the University of Toronto. She obtained her medical degree from Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario. She has a Bachelor’s degree in Microbiology and Immunology from McGill University, and a Specialization Bachelor’s degree in Cell and Molecular Biology from Concordia University in Montreal, Quebec. Her current research interests focus on the development of tools and methods to improve resident and medical student teaching and evaluation. While in medical school she developed an OSCE Simulator web application – a teaching tool designed to aid medical students in the acquisition of clinical skills. During residency her research included the development of an interactive computer-based application to standardize the administration of oral examinations in anatomical pathology. She is currently working on the design and development of novel digital methods to enhance anatomical pathology teaching.

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Michelle Downes, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre

Dr. Downes graduated from the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland medical school in 2002. She undertook training in surgery leading to her membership of the Royal College of Surgeons (MRCSI). Following this she completed two years of laboratory research in prostate cancer at University College Dublin and was awarded her Doctor of Medicine (MD). She commenced training in anatomic pathology in Dublin in 2007 followed by a clinical fellowship in genitourinary pathology at the University Health Network in Toronto during which time she was awarded FRCPC. She practices at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre in Toronto as a urologic pathologist and is director of research in anatomic pathology. She is an assistant professor at the University of Toronto.

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Harriet Feilotter, Queen’s University

Dr. Feilotter is an Associate Professor in the Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine at Queen’s University, where she maintains an active research program dedicated to biomarker discovery and validation in a variety of human diseases. As the Chief Scientific Officer of Indoc Research, a not-for-profit service provider, she oversees the genomic and proteomic laboratory operations of that entity, with a special interest in the integration of platforms designed to support large-scale studies of human DNA, RNA and proteins. In her role as Service Chief of Kingston General Hospital Laboratory Genetics, she also oversees the clinical genetics program. This combination of job responsibilities allows her to focus on methods to bridge the gap between research and clinical application of biomarker findings.

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Marcio Mendes Gomes, The Ottawa Hospital

Dr. Marcio Gomes is Associate Professor of Pathology, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine; Thoracic Pathology Lead, The Ottawa Hospital; Chair, Education Section, Canadian Association of Pathologists; and Clinician Educator, Royal College International. Read more

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C. Paul JohnsonC. Paul Johnson, Royal Liverpool University Hospital

I studied undergraduate medicine at the University of Liverpool and graduated in 1986. Following 2 years of clinical medicine, I spent 3 years training in Histopathology (Anatomical Pathology) in the University of Glasgow before taking up the Lectureship in Forensic Pathology back in Liverpool. I completed both histopathology and forensic pathology specialist training and was appointed consultant in 1995 and a Home Office Pathologist the following year. In 1998, I was awarded a higher medical research degree(MD) for a thesis entitled ‘A biomechanical and histomorphometric study of the vertebral artery.’ Over the last 20 years of forensic practice, I have maintained an interest in traumatic vertebral artery injury and methods of investigating deaths from traumatic basal subarachnoid haemorrhage. I also have a major interest in the postgraduate training and examining of forensic pathologists and lead the training program in Liverpool, one of only four approved centers in England and Wales, where we have two fully funded government specialty registrar posts. Actively involved in national committee work which included the recent development of forensic pathology as a separate specialty, I currently chair the panel of forensic examiners at the Royal College of Pathologists in London.

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Raymond Maung, Royal Inland Hospital

Graduated from the Institute of Medicine (1), Rangoon, Burma. Trained in Anatomic Pathology in Calgary and MBA from the University of Victoria. Worked in various positions in Red Deer, Victoria and Kamloops, as staff pathologist, head of a professional group, head of department and region. With BC Association of Laboratory Physicians as active member, treasurer, secretary and president. With CAP-ACP, member at large of the Executive, chair of the Workload and Workforce committee, member at large with the AP section, member at large with Patient Safety and Quality Assurance section. Main interest is in pathology manpower, quality assurance/improvement and their impact on laboratory services and patient safety.

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Gregg Morin, Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre, BC Cancer Agency

Dr. Morin is the Head of Proteomics at the Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre, Senior Scientist at the British Columbia Cancer Agency, and Associate Professor in the Department of Medical Genetics at the University of British Columbia. He spent several years in the biotechnology industry, as VP Biology at MDS Proteomics (Toronto), and as Director of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry with Geron Corporation (California). During that time, he oversaw programs focusing on telomerase biochemistry and drug discovery, and led efforts to identify new therapeutic targets employing large scale protein interaction mapping and mass spectrometry. The programs at Geron were the first to clone the human telomerase catalytic subunit and to demonstrate that telomerase expression can overcome replicative senescence in cultured normal human cells without transformation. Dr. Morin has numerous issued patents stemming from his industry work, and has multiple publications in high impact journals. His expertise is in target identification and validation, and the biochemistry and biology of ribonucleoprotein complexes and RNA processing, and proteomics. Dr. Morin’s research focuses on understanding the function of somatically mutated cancer genes, with an emphasis on proteins involved in the regulation of alternative splicing, and has developed methods for ultra high coverage and quantification of the proteome of FFPE tumour sections.

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Viren Naik, University of Ottawa

Dr. Viren Naik is the Vice President, Education for The Ottawa Hospital and Professor of Anesthesiology at the University of Ottawa. He has 20 years experience as an educator, and is now focused on leading interprofessional education initiatives at his hospital to enhance the learner experience and improve the quality and safety for patients.

In 2001, he obtained a Master of Education degree from the University of Toronto, and a Fellowship in Education from The Wilson Centre for Research in Education. Dr. Naik was recruited to St. Michael’s Hospital, and in 2004, he was appointed Medical Director of the Allan Waters’ Family Patient Simulation Centre. In 2009, he was recruited from the University of Toronto to establish the University of Ottawa Skills and Simulation Centre (uOSSC) as the inaugural Medical Director. Dr. Naik has served the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada as Chair of the national written certification examination for his specialty. He has also served as a Clinician Educator with the Royal College tasked with advancing simulation and CanMEDS for postgraduate education and continuing professional development, both nationally and internationally. In 2007 and 2013, Dr. Naik received honour awards from the Canadian Anesthesiologists’ Society for his international contributions to education.

In 2015, Dr. Naik completed an Executive MBA at the Telfer School of Management to further develop his leadership competencies.

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Deepti RaviDeepti Ravi, McMaster University

Dr. Deepti Ravi is currently a senior (PGY5) and former chief resident of the General Pathology program at McMaster University, ON. She grew up in England where she completed her schooling following which she joined the prestigious Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, School of Medicine. She is the first and the only Canadian pathology resident to have won the American society of Clinical pathologists – 40 under 40 award which honors residents and pathologists under the age of 40 for their contributions to laboratory medicine. She is actively involved in enhancing pathology and resident education within North America and is the only Canadian sitting on the resident council of the American Society of Clinical Pathology. In her spare time she is also a personal stylist and enjoys playing tennis.

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Wendy P Robinson, University of British Columbia

Wendy Robinson earned a PhD in Genetics at the University of California, Berkeley, specializing in population genetics and genetic epidemiology, and was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Zurich, Switzerland, from 1989-1994 focusing on chromosomal disorders. Since 1994, Dr. Robinson has been a faculty member of the Department of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada, where she is currently full professor. She is also on the Research Leadership Council at the BC Child & Family Research Institute and Asst. Dean of Graduate and Postdoctoral Education in the Faculty of Medicine. Her research interests involve many areas, including genetic and epigenetic aspects of placental and early human development and pregnancy complication, and bridges from basic biology to clinical application.

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Kasmintan Schrader, University of British Columbia

Dr Schrader is a clinician-scientist in the BC Cancer Research Centre’s Department of Molecular Oncology, Medical Geneticist and Interim Co-Medical Director of the Hereditary Cancer Program, BC Cancer Agency, and an Assistant Professor in the University of British Columbia’s, Department of Medical Genetics. She received her Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery from the University of Melbourne and completed her medical genetics training at the University of British Columbia. Dr Schrader undertook her graduate studies at the BC Cancer Agency in the University of British Columbia’s, Department of Pathology and undertook the first 3-year phase of her Canadian Institutes of Health Research Clinician-Scientist training award studying novel hereditary cancer susceptibility gene discovery at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York. Dr Schrader’s research interests include understanding the genetic basis of all types of cancer susceptibility in individuals and families affected by the disease.

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Rebecca Scott Yoshizawa, Simon Fraser University

Dr. Yoshizawa has a PhD in Sociology from Queen’s University, with other degrees in Gender Studies and Communication. She specializes in transdisciplinary health research, bioethics, reproductive politics, feminist research, and qualitative empirical methods. Her doctoral work and current research focuses on the ‘naturalculturalism’ of placentas, or the intersecting social, cultural, affective, biological, and material affiliations instantiated in placental life. She is currently a postdoctoral researcher in the GeNA Lab at SFU, focusing on the social implications of cancer genomics, and is also a sessional instructor of reproductive politics and nonhumanism in Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies at SFU.

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Edward Stelow, University of Virginia School of Medicine

Edward Stelow grew up in Wisconsin (a state in the United States just south of the middle of Canada). He attended college at the University of Chicago and medical school at the Medical College of Wisconsin. He completed a residency of Anatomic and Clinical pathology at the University of Minnesota with fellowships in general surgical pathology and cytopathogy. He has worked as an anatomic pathologist at the University of Virginia since completing his training.

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Angela J. Tate, Memorial University of Newfoundland & Eastern Health

Dr. Tate is a PGY 5 Resident in Anatomical Pathology at Memorial University of Newfoundland & Eastern Health. She has an interest in cytology, lung pathology including interstitial lung diseases, and enjoys working in inter-disciplinary teams with clinical colleagues. When not studying she is parenting her four busy young sons.

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Janis M. TaubeJanis M. Taube, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Dr. Taube is the Director of Dermatopathology at Johns Hopkins Hospital, and she has both a strong diagnostic and research interest in melanoma. Her research interests center on the immune evasion by melanoma and the identification of potential biomarkers of response to novel immunotherapies. This requires a focus on immunohistochemical and molecular methods for identifying cell surface antigens and signaling pathways in paraffin-embedded tissue. Dr. Taube’s lab described PD-L1-mediated adaptive immune resistance by melanoma, a finding which has now been extended to many other solid tumor types. She also developed a robust IHC assay and methods of interpretation for studying PD-L1 as it relates to therapeutic response, versions of which are now FDA approved. Her ongoing laboratory efforts focus on further characterizing the tumor microenvironment with the aim of developing rational treatment combinations and improving on patient selection algorithms.

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Jefferson TerryJefferson Terry, BC Children’s and Women’s Hospital

Dr. Terry trained in anatomical pathology at the University of British Columbia and in pediatric and perinatal pathology at Boston Children’s and Brigham and Women’s Hospitals. Dr. Terry currently practices pediatric and perinatal pathology at BC Children’s and Women’s Hospital. His research interests include developing prenatal diagnostic tests based on placental pathological processes.

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Rosemarie Tremblay-LeMay, Université Laval

Dr. Tremblay-LeMay is a PGY-4 resident at Université Laval. She has a strong interest in research and completed a Master’s degree in experimental medicine in 2010. During the course of her residency she became interested in research in medical education. In collaboration with Dr Karine Turcotte, a fellow resident, as well as her program director Dr Christian Couture and other educators from Université Laval’s Faculty of Medicine, she designed a curriculum evaluation project that aimed to evaluate the PGY1 of their program regarding achievement of objectives specific to pathology. She is currently involved in her residency program committee as chief resident.

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Brent L. WoodBrent L. Wood, University of Washington

Dr. Wood’s professional responsibilities include extensive clinical service work and teaching Hematopathology to medical technology students, medical students, residents and fellows. Flow cytometry is an area of particular interest for Dr. Wood and he is responsible for implementing the first use of 9 and 10 color flow cytometry in the clinical laboratory and exploiting its potential for the identification of minimal residual disease in acute lymphoid and myeloid leukemia. His laboratory serves as one of two national reference laboratories for the identification of minimal residual disease in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia for the Children’s Oncology Group and is involved in similar protocols with the Southwest Oncology Group. Dr. Wood lectures both nationally and internationally on clinical applications of flow cytometry and is Past President of the International Clinical Cytometry Society.

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Stephen YipStephen Yip, University of British Columbia

Dr. Yip completed his combined MD-PhD training at the University of British Columbia and was accepted into the UBC neurosurgery program. He switched to the neuropathology training program after four years of life as a surgeon. He was awarded a Royal College Clinician Investigator Fellowship after the completion of his neuropathology residency and completed a research fellowship with Dr David Louis at the Massachusetts General Hospital. He also completed a molecular genetic pathology fellowship at MGH under the mentorship of Dr John Iafrate. Dr. Yip currently practices adult neuropathology and genomic pathology at Vancouver General Hospital. He is also the pathology lead of the Personalized OncoGenomics (POG) program at BC Cancer Agency. His research interests include deciphering the molecular pathogenesis of brain tumours particularly of low grade gliomas, the application of next generation sequencing technology in clinical oncology, and the implementation of advanced diagnostic assays in clinical settings.

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George M. Yousef, University of Toronto

Dr. Yousef is an anatomical pathologist and the Division Head of Molecular Diagnostics at St. Michael’s Hospital, Toronto. Canada. He is a Professor at the University of Toronto. He is also the director of postgraduate research of the Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology and the director of the CELIC Centre for molecular innovation at St. Michael’s hospital. His research is focused on the cancer biomarkers in renal cell carcinoma and prostate cancer using an integrated genomic, quantitative proteomic, transcriptomic and miRNA approach with extensive bioinformatics analysis. He has over 200 published research papers and review articles and 15 book chapters. He is the editor of a book on “Molecular Pathology in Cancer”. Dr. Yousef is a founding member of the International Scientific Committee of Kallikreins and the Vice President of the International Society of Enzymology. He is the editor-in-Chief of the Canadian Journal of Pathology. He is the chair of the Kidney Cancer Research Network of Canada personalized medicine initiative; and a member of the Royal College Examination Board in Anatomical pathology.

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